Posted 2 weeks ago

tumblangeles:

latimes:

This gif shows the progression of California’s drought since 2011. See it unfold more slowly with these 188 maps.

This drought isn’t fucking around. So don’t you fuck around either in conserving your water! 

Posted 1 month ago

Midwestern farmers wage war against 'superweeds' : Business

Posted 1 month ago
Posted 1 month ago

inothernews:

At the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crash site outside Donetsk, Ukraine, sad, surreal scenes of unsecured plane debris — and bodies of the 298 dead — scattered across farmland and flowered fields(Photos: Maxim Smeyev / Reuters; Brendan Hoffman / Getty Images and Dmitry Lovetsky / AP via the New York Times)

Posted 1 month ago

Ten Things You Didn’t Know About Ground Beef

agrithoughts:

Beef- It’s What’s for Dinner!!

Some must know ground beef facts!

Posted 2 months ago
Posted 3 months ago
Posted 3 months ago

http:// http//tmblr.co/ZtJ7bq1FH-vaP

Crops that are better together

Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for plants. But while phosphorus is present in soils, it is often tied up in an organic form that plants cannot use.

To overcome the lack of available phosphorus, and to increase crop productivity, inorganic phosphorus fertilisers are widely used. The main source of phosphorus fertiliser is mineral deposits, with 85% of the global resource being located in Morocco and Western Sahara. This concentrated geographical distribution means that global food security is threatened, not only by finite supplies of rock phosphate fertiliser, but also through potential geopolitical instability.

For future food security it is a necessity that we harness the phosphorus already present in soil.

BBSRC-funded research headed by Prof. Phil Haygarth and Dr Tim George is looking into improving phosphorous efficiency by growing two crops together which have complimentary plant traits, a technique known as bi-cropping.

Some plants help mobilise organic phosphorus in soils by producing organic acids (citrate), while others exude enzymes (phytase) from their roots that mineralise organic phosphorus into forms that plants can use (see bottom image right). Combining plants with these traits may improve the use of soil phosphorus and help deliver food security in coming decades.

Images and research from a group of institutes including The James Hutton Institute, Lancaster Environment Centre and Rothamsted Research.

Top image: Cereal/Clover mixtures in the field

Middle left: Root gene expression

Middle right: Extraction of root architectural data in 2D

Bottom image: Left side shows Barley crop alone compared to right side with Barley + Clover bi-cropping system.

Read more at: http://www.rothamsted.ac.uk/roots_Pfertiliser

Posted 4 months ago

agrithoughts:

silmeheniel:

agrithoughts:

silmeheniel:

Amazingly corn, wheat and soybeans are not necessary in human diets,
Amazingly, Americans throw away over 40% of the food they bring home. This does not include food that the stores dispose of.
Additionally, most processed foods are composed primarily of corn, wheat, and soy.
I’m just saying a decline in the production of corn, wheat and soybeans is not necessarily a bad thing for humans.

Decline in the production of the crop will also lead to an even larger cost increase of meat (fake meats used in vegetarian diets), oils, pet foods and various items that use the crops byproduct for creation.

Just because humans don’t eat it, doesn’t mean there isn’t a different use for it or it’s by products.

Hey you are entitled to your opinion too, I just both disagree with the use of pesticides and with the use of this statistic as a defense for pesticides.

The reason I always reblog responses and then my responses is so my followers can see the two sides of the coin. Obviously my opinion is going to be different, but the best way for people to create their own is to see all sides of a “fact”.

Posted 5 months ago

peopledanceandsing:

Human Organs Formed with Wild Plant Arrangements by Camila Carlow

UK-based, Guatemalan-born artist Camila Carlow was not deterred by the complexity of the human body when she was developing her series Eye Heart Spleen. For the project, she transformed a handful of normally grotesque, bloody organs into an array of greenery and beautiful blossoms.

this is beautiful!

(Source: f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s)